Sunday, October 19, 2008

A Fundamental Difference in Perspective

Last Wednesday I watched the debate. I hope y'all did, too, and I hope you listened closely.
John McCain said Sarah Palin could understand the needs of special needs family. He talked about the need to help these families so that folks with special needs could reach their full potential.

Barack Obama's focus was about the money these programs would suck down.

Do we see a fundamental difference between one who sees imperfect people as still having potential and one who sees them as a financial burden?

That leaves me with some questions:
1. At what point does someone go from being a problem to having potential?
2. Do I want a leader who sees the problem of people (not wanting his daughter "punished" if they get pregnant) or the potential of people?
3. According to Obama, where do you fall? Are you a problem that burdens America, or are you do you have potential to make a difference in your life and others'?

Just so you know, God says you are part of the solution, and He doesn't see you as a problem.

The foundational question is whether you want a leader with God's heart or man's agenda.

Something to seriously consider...

Copyright Jerri Phillips 2008

1 comments:

Jan Parrish said...

Very good insight. :)

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